Understanding Monsters: How Monstrosity is Constructed

Today, 30th of August in 1797 Mary Shelley (Mary Godwin Wollstonecraft) was born. She gave us one of the most beautiful and important books ever written: Frankenstein. This month Generally Gothic hosted a discussion on Monstrosity (if you have not heard about her website please visit and see by yourself how interesting, well researched and…

The Uncanny as a Source of Horror in “The Vampyre”

In previous posts, we have been revising the concepts of horror and terror, this time we are going to review those concepts in a literary text. My suggestion was to read The Vampyre, a tale written by John William Polidori. ✶ John Polidori John Polidori was Lord Byron’s doctor. Polidori started to write The Vampyre…

The Shadowy Boundary Between Terror and Horror

In the previous post, we discussed how terror and horror could function as devices for producing the sublime. But we may wonder if there is any difference between terror and horror. Today we are going to check that out by reviewing one of the most important essays on this topic that was written by Ann…

In Search of Terror and Horror in The Sublime

Have you ever wondered why when reading a gothic novel you constantly find the words terror and horror? But what these words refer to? Believe it or not, these two concepts are also fundamental for understanding the role that nature has played in literature. Let’s take a walk in this mysterious path, in this entry…

The Gothic

“To a warm imagination, the dubious forms that float half-veiled in darkness, afford a higher delight than the most distinct scenery that the sun can shown”. – Ann Radcliffe. The Mysteries of Udolpho. 1794 What is gothic? Is it a literary genre? A style? An intellectual movement? There are so many questions and maybe we…